Toronto Blue Jays News

Blue Jays records that could be broken in 2022

Henry Wright
TORONTO, ONTARIO - OCTOBER 3: George Springer #4 of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrates his home run with teammate Vladimir Guerrero Jr. #27 in the first inning during their MLB game against the Baltimore Orioles at the Rogers Centre on October 3, 2021 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Mark Blinch/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ONTARIO - OCTOBER 3: George Springer #4 of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrates his home run with teammate Vladimir Guerrero Jr. #27 in the first inning during their MLB game against the Baltimore Orioles at the Rogers Centre on October 3, 2021 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Mark Blinch/Getty Images) /
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Jordan Romano
TORONTO, ON – APRIL 15: Jordan Romano #68 of the Toronto Blue Jays pitches to the Oakland Athletics in the ninth inning during their MLB game at the Rogers Centre on April 15, 2022 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. All players are wearing the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. (Photo by Mark Blinch/Getty Images) /

Jordan Romano

It’s very early, but Jordan Romano already has six saves through the Blue Jays first 10 games. That’s obviously a completely unsustainable pace, but if he even continues at half that efficiency, he would easily break Duane Ward’s franchise record of 45 in 1993. Romano has been the Blue Jays full-time closer for less than a year, yet has already proven himself as one of baseball’s most reliable last game arms. He’s converted a franchise-record 29 consecutive save opportunities dating back to May 11, 2021, so if he’s given the opportunity, I see no reason why he won’t hit 45 at the very least in 2022.

Saves are great and all, but in reality, they’re often not that hard to get. You could come into the game up three runs, let up two straight bombs, get three fluky outs, and still get the save. ERA is a much better measure of a pitcher’s true effectiveness, and BJ Ryan currently holds the Blue Jays record for lowest reliever ERA (at least 60 innings pitched), posting a 1.37 in 2006 over 72.1 innings. It may be tough, but the way he’s pitching right now, it’s certainly not impossible.

Reliever records in general can be a bit tricky since the role of relievers has changed so much over the years, but given how he’s pitching, he should be on watch for almost anything. To add to that, he also has a pretty good shot at breaking most records for Canadian-born relievers with the Jays (many of which he already owns).

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