Toronto Blue Jays News

Blue Jays: A Look At The Prospects Going To Oakland

Jun 10, 2019; Fayetteville, AR, USA; Mississippi Rebels pitcher Gunnar Hoglund (17) throws a pitch during the game against the Arkansas Razorbacks at Baum-Walker Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Brett Rojo-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 10, 2019; Fayetteville, AR, USA; Mississippi Rebels pitcher Gunnar Hoglund (17) throws a pitch during the game against the Arkansas Razorbacks at Baum-Walker Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Brett Rojo-USA TODAY Sports /
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Blue Jays
Jul 10, 2020; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto Blue Jays infielder Kevin Smith (78) fields a ground ball during an intra-squad game in summer training at Rogers Centre. Mandatory Credit: Dan Hamilton-USA TODAY Sports /

Kevin Smith
Atkins drafted Kevin Smith in the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft and signed him to a $405,100 signing bonus.  He was immediately ranked as one of the top 20 prospects in the organization and looked like he had taken giant steps in 2018 when he collected 31 doubles, 25 home runs and 93 RBI while posting a slash line of .302/.358/.528, which lifted him into the top 10 prospects in the organization.  Smith was unable to build on his 2018 season and struggled at Double-A in a 2019 campaign that saw him finish with a batting average of .209 with 151 strikeouts over 468 plate appearances, and it dropped him down the list.

This past season Smith played the entire year at Triple-A until injuries occurred to the Blue Jays infield and he received an opportunity with the big club.  Smith started eight games at third base, while also starting a game in the outfield and one at first base.  Smith looked adequate in the field, but struggled at the plate.  In 36 plate appearances he went 3 for 32 (.094) with 11 strikeouts, but did collect his first and only career home run on August 29 against the Detroit Tigers.

At the time of the trade, Smith was rated as the ninth top prospect in the organization, however, there are five other infielders all rated higher who are a little younger and have a lot more upside.  He will be 27 years old this summer and will now get an opportunity with the Athletics that he would never have got with the Blue Jays, as he will have an actual chance of breaking camp in Oakland.

Blue Jays
LOUISVILLE, KY – JUNE 09: Zach Logue of the Kentucky Wildcats delivers a pitch against the Louisville Cardinals during the 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Baseball Super Regional at Jim Patterson Stadium on June 9, 2017 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /

Zach Logue
The Blue Jays were able to get Zach Logue in the ninth round of the 2017 draft, which was the same season they selected Nate Pearson.  Logue was signed to a $125,000 signing bonus and has been a starting pitcher throughout his entire minor league career.  Every season, Logue has split time at two different levels and has a career minor league record of 32-16 with a 3.43 ERA and 1.178 WHIP over 84 games.

Logue spent the majority of 2021 with the Triple-A Buffalo Bisons where he posted a 9-3 record and 3.32 ERA.  Throughout his professional ball career, Logue has had good control and has averaged nearly four strikeouts to every walk.  Logue was fairly unknown due to the higher profile pitchers, but after his successful 2021 season found himself in the top 30 prospect list at #27.

Wednesday morning, the Blue Jays acquired Matt Chapman for four prospects who should make it to the big leagues, but none are their top prospects.

Logue will be turning 26 years old next month and likely would never have a shot at the rotation in the near future unless the club had several injuries.  Currently the Jays have a rotation of Jose Berrios, Kevin Gausman, Hyun Jin Ryu, Alek Manoah and Yusei Kikuchi, with both Ross Stripling and Nate Pearson trying to find a way to get into a starter’s job.

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