Toronto Blue Jays News

Opposing pitchers on the wrong side of Blue Jays history

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 23: Joe Carter #29 of the Toronto Blue Jays bats against the Philadelphia Phillies during game 6 of the World Series on October 23, 1993 at Exhibition Stadium in Toronto, Ontario. Toronto won the series 4 games to 2. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 23: Joe Carter #29 of the Toronto Blue Jays bats against the Philadelphia Phillies during game 6 of the World Series on October 23, 1993 at Exhibition Stadium in Toronto, Ontario. Toronto won the series 4 games to 2. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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PHILADELPHIA – 1993: Mitch Williams of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches during an MLB game at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the 1993 season. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

Mitch Williams – Game Six World Series 1992

With the Blue Jays entering their second World Series in as many years, the club was facing a tough Philadelphia Phillies team that boasted a very strong pitching corps along with a solid batting order.

The series ultimately went to six games and came down the wire once again, with the Blue Jays entering Game Six with a chance to win it all in front of a home crowd (unlike the year prior). While this game did not go to extra innings like in 1992, it surely came down to the wire in the ninth inning, where the Jays batting order was able to put some runners in scoring position before Joe Carter hit one of the biggest home runs in franchise history.

Some of the biggest moments in Blue Jays history have come in extra innings or off a walk-off home run. Whatever happened to the opposing pitchers?

Phillies closer Mitch ‘Wild Thing’ Williams came into the ninth inning with a narrow 6-5 lead. The right-hander walked Rickey Henderson before getting Devon White to pop-up but allowed Paul Molitor to get on base with a single, putting runners on first and second. Carter was next to bat amongst the WAMCO lineup and put the ball over the left-field wall, scoring three runs and making the Blue Jays back-to-back World Series champions.

After the 1993 season, Williams struggled at the Major League level, sporting 7.65 and 6.75 ERA’s the following seasons with the Houston Astros (the Phillies traded him after the 1993 World Series) and California Angels respectively. His last season was in 1997 with the Kansas City Royals, where he appeared in only seven games and allowed eight earned runs through 6.2 innings.

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