Toronto Blue Jays News

Ranking the 10 greatest infielders in Blue Jays history

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 18: Josh Donaldson #20 of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrates with teammate Edwin Encarnacion #10 after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians during game four of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 18, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 18: Josh Donaldson #20 of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrates with teammate Edwin Encarnacion #10 after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians during game four of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 18, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images) /
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TORONTO, ON – CIRCA 1988: Fred McGriff #19 of the Toronto Blue Jays bats against the Oakland Athletics during an Major League Baseball game circa 1988 at Exhibition Stadium in Toronto, Ontario. McGriff played for the Blue Jays from 1986-90. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

9. Fred McGriff

The former Yankee draft pick was acquired in a trade by the Blue Jays in one of the better trades throughout franchise history. After a cup of coffee in 1986, Fred McGriff stepped into more of a full-time role as a DH and hit 20 home runs.

Once McGriff became a full-time first baseman in the 1988 season, he slashed .282/.376/.552 with 34 home runs and 82 RBI. He then followed that up by hitting a league-leading 36 home runs and posting a league-leading .924 OPS. He finished sixth in the MVP balloting and won the Silver Slugger award that season.

McGriff followed that up with his best season yet in the Major Leagues, amassing a .300/.400/.530 slash line with 35 home runs and 88 RBI.

In a three-year span from 1988 to 1990, McGriff had a 157 WRC+. This was second in the American League, only behind Jose Canseco. His 105 home runs also led the American League.

McGriff doesn’t have longevity with the organization which is why he isn’t higher on the list, but he still posted three terrific seasons in Toronto. Hitting 30+ home runs three years in a row with an OPS over .920 in each of those seasons is not an easy feat.

He’s eleventh in franchise history in home runs despite only playing four full seasons with the Blue Jays. He’s third in franchise history in OBP, slugging percentage, and OPS.

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