May 29, 2013; Atlanta, GA, USA; Toronto Blue Jays relief pitcher Esmil Rogers (32) pitches in the second inning against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field. Mandatory Credit: Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

Esmil Rogers or Chad Jenkins


The Toronto Blue Jays have had a lot of injuries to their starting rotation while also trying to fix Ricky Romero. They’ve had to use numerous pitchers to start games this season in an effort to replace their real starters.

Fortunately Josh Johnson is back.

Chien-Ming-Wang earned the right to stick around by pitching into the 8th inning for just the 4th time this season by a Blue Jays starter. Someone that can eat up innings is important. If he gives up 5 runs in the process every time out the Jays will just have to put up with that until one of their real starters is back.

Hopefully Wang’s performance wasn’t a fluke so the Jays finally have some stability in their rotation for the first time in a while.

That leaves the last spot in the rotation. Unless the Jays have anything new up their sleeve Esmil Rogers or Chad Jenkins would be that starter.

Right now it’s Esmil Rogers.

According to Alex Anthopoulos the reason Jenkins isn’t in the big leagues is because the Jays want to have some depth in the minor leagues. They also felt Jenkins had some balls hit hard against him in his last start against San Diego. He had a decent start but that’s a trend that doesn’t usually lead to more success.

So should the Jays go with Rogers or Jenkins for the foreseeable future.

Jenkins has pitched at least 5 innings in all 6 of his big league starts.

Rogers longest start for the Jays has been 4 innings without his pitch count getting to 80. But there’s probably less chance that he gets hit around as much as Jenkins, assuming the Jays scouts know what they’re doing.

The Jays might want to develop Jenkins more in the minor leagues but he’s the better bet to give you innings. If the Jays really want to have depth in the minors it would make some sense to send Rogers to the minors so they can stretch him out as starter and see how he does when he has to throw 90 – 100 pitches.

Rogers will pitch less innings then Jenkins but he’s also more likely to be able to shut a team down for 3 or 4 innings. It’s just that the Jays bullpen has already been overworked like a motherf**ker this season and you can never guess when it’ll need some rest.

If the Jays use Jenkins they could also put Rogers back in the pen to help out that overworked bullpen.

Rogers and Jenkins both have an upside and downside to being in the Jays rotation. Until one of the real starters is back the Jays have to figure out which one has more upside.

Tags: Toronto Blue Jays

  • malna

    It has also been stated by management that Jenkins needs to work on his off speed pitches further in the minor leagues. His sinking fastball is pretty good, but it is not enough. The decision to keep Jenkins in AAA is not just to have minor league depth, as you so simply state.

    Rogers is just a better pitcher than Jenkins. Better fastball than Jenkins, better slider as compared to a non existent secondary pitch from Jenkins.

    It has been stated by both Hale and Gibbons that Rogers is currently being stretched out as much as possible.

    In Rogers’ first start he was supposed to go 60-80 pitches and he did that. The second start was supposed to be 70-90 pitches and he did that. The third should be somewhere between 80-100, and Jenkins will only be coming back in case of injury or extreme performance.

    Neither Rogers nor Jenkins will ever make it through an AL lineup three times in one night on a consistent basis, but Rogers certainly has a better chance than Jenkins.

    • RyanMueller

      Well said. I like Jenkins because he seems to be more of a pitcher than Rogers. Rogers is a thrower. I do think that Rogers has earned the chance to continue to start until the league adjusts to him.

  • revolu888

    Rogers can’t be sent down to the minors without being exposed to waivers, he’s out of options.

    • RyanMueller

      Good point; hence, why he made the team out of spring training.