Toronto Blue Jays News

Blue Jays: Areas to focus on with their first pick at the 2022 MLB Draft

TORONTO, ON - APRIL 25: Ross Atkins General Manager of the Toronto Blue Jays speaks on the phone ahead of playing the Boston Red Sox in their MLB game at the Rogers Centre on April 25, 2022 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Mark Blinch/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - APRIL 25: Ross Atkins General Manager of the Toronto Blue Jays speaks on the phone ahead of playing the Boston Red Sox in their MLB game at the Rogers Centre on April 25, 2022 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Mark Blinch/Getty Images) /
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Nov 13, 2019; Scottsdale, AZ, USA; Toronto Blue Jays general manager Ross Atkins speaks with members of the media during general managers meetings at the Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports /

College Level Left-Handed Starter

Last year, the Blue Jays drafted and signed 12 pitchers from the 2021 MLB Draft, restocking the pitching depth within the system. This was a smart move in retrospect considering the Jays are now dealing with top prospect CJ Van Eyk undergoing Tommy John surgery while also trading away Gunnar Hoglund this past Spring Training. Alek Manoah and Nate Pearson have also progressed throughout the system and the Jays have a lot of pitching prospects who are still two to three years away from potentially knocking on the MLB door.

The Jays could consider using their 23rd pick on a college-level arm, one with some experience and who won’t require as much development as a high-school pitcher if the right player is available.  Looking at the starting pitching depth charts and top prospect list, Ricky Tiedemann is the only left-hander really standing out while Nick Allgeyer and Anthony Kay may be considered bullpen options moving forward, at least at the big league level. Adding another southpaw who could slot in at High-A and take a run at the Minor League system next year is just the extra layer of the depth the organization could really use.

That pitcher being a southpaw would also be ideal considering the Jays’ starting depth is right-handed heavy, although most of the top MLB Draft hopefuls who are considered pitchers appear to be high schoolers. This move could also benefit the Jays if they can find the right college pitcher to sign under the slot of the $3,075,300 value for the #23 pick while a high-school pitcher may command more to persuade them from heading to play college ball.

Potential Draftees: Connor Prielipp (Alabama), Cooper Hjerpe (Oregon State),

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